Wedding Photographers Southport

Call Bryan07955 888 761 or email


Quote my wedding

Wedding day coverage from just £1,150

We are a friendly family company of wedding photographers based in Churchtown, Southport. We work mainly but not exclusively in the North West.

There is something truly exciting in sharing a beautiful wedding day and capturing those magical images. We believe our part is to photograph and document your day, allowing it to unfold naturally. Our photojournalistic approach to the day means we capture those special candid moments that you will love and treasure.

We also make sure we capture the traditional images too and love to get a little creative. We love to make images that will wow you. As well as being professional on your day we like to have some fun along the way. We enjoy traveling and are available to work throughout the UK. We offer destination packages within Europe and further if you need!


Meet the wedding photography team

photography wedding photographers southport

Bryan Farrell

Owner/Wedding Photographer

I have always loved photography and capturing images for family, friends and myself. In 2009 I decided to turn my much loved hobby into my career

I have enjoyed every moment of it since and couldn't imagine doing anything else.



Trainee wedding photography southport

Lloyd Irwin

Trainee Wedding Photographer/Assistant

I am a college student studying photography and public services.

I hope that when I finish my course I can become a Fireman but I will always have a passion for photography.




Accountant wedding photographers Southport

Alex Farrell

Accountant/Marketing

I am a university student living in California studying accounting and marketing.

I am a passionate surfer and I love the lifestyle over here. I am a huge football fan and my dream job is to be the accountant for Manchester United.




The bulk of our work is wedding photography although we do also provide portrait and baby photographic services. As well as getting involved covering charity events.

This means that almost all of our work is carried out on location, so we have little need to maintain a studio, because of that we decided not to have a fixed walk in studio or address. This means we can be more flexible and it also helps keep our costs down so we can offer you the best value and service.

To help you budget for your wedding we take a deposit of just £500. This secures your booking. The balance will be due one month before your wedding day. Additional items such as albums can be chosen and paid for up to after your wedding.

Acceptable payment methods are:

Cash.

Cheque.

Bank transfer.

Most major credit cards.

Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions, on either 07955 888 761 or via our email




























Wikipedia entry on on Wedding Photography

Due to the nature of the bulky equipment and lighting issues, wedding photography was largely a studio practice for most of the late 19th century. Over time, technology improved, but many couples still might only pose for a single wedding portrait. Wedding albums started becoming more commonplace towards the 1880s, and the photographer would sometimes include the wedding party in the photographs. Often the wedding gifts would be laid out and recorded in the photographs as well.

At the beginning of the 20th century, colour photography became available, but was still unreliable and expensive, so most wedding photography was still practiced in black and white. The concept of capturing the wedding "event" came about after the Second World War. Using film roll technology and improved lighting techniques available with the invention of the compact flash bulb, photographers would often show up at a wedding and try to sell the photos later. Despite the initial low quality photographs that often resulted, the competition forced the studio photographers to start working on location.

Initially, professional studio photographers might bring a lot of bulky equipment, thus limiting their ability to record the entire event. Even "candid" photos were more often staged after the ceremony. In the 1970s, the more modern approach to recording the entire wedding event started evolving into the practice as we know it today, including a more "documentary" style of photography

Technology

During the film era, photographers favoured colour negative film and medium-format cameras, especially by Hasselblad. Today, many more weddings are photographed with digital SLR cameras as the digital convenience provides quick detection of lighting mistakes and allows creative approaches to be reviewed immediately.

In spite of diminishing film use, some photographers continue to shoot with film as they prefer the film aesthetic, and others are of the opinion that negative film captures more information than digital technology, and has less margin for exposure error. Certainly true in some cases, it should be noted that exposure latitude inherent in a camera's native Raw image format (which allows for more under- and over- exposure than JPEG) varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. All forms of RAW have a degree of exposure latitude which exceeds slide film - to which digital capture is commonly compared.

Technology has evolved with the use of remote triggers and flashes. Wedding photographers are now able to take advantage of traveling light and having the ability to use creative lighting.

Approaches

There are two primary approaches to wedding photography that are recognised today: Traditional and Photojournalistic. Traditional wedding photography provides for more classically posed images and a great deal of photographer control interaction on the day of the wedding. A Photojournalist style of wedding photography takes its cue from editorial reporting styles and focuses more on candid images with little photographer interaction. These are two extremes and many of today's photographers will fall somewhere in the middle of these two styles.

A third style that is becoming more popular is a fashion-based approach. In contemporary/fashion-based wedding photography, photojournalist will combine candid images of the events of the day with posed images that are inspired by editorial fashion photography as would be found in magazines like Vogue or Vanity Fair. This style often involves more innovative and dramatic post-processing of images.

A fourth style that is popular in Asian countries, especially in China, is wedding studio photography (Chinese: 婚纱摄影; pinyin: hūn shā shè yǐng). Typically, couples will select a studio in a similar manner as western couples select a wedding photographer. They will then make an appointment with the studio for either in-studio or location shoot, which is becoming popular in recent years, to do "glamour wedding shots". In attendance will be a hair stylist and make-up artist in addition to the photographer and the couple. The couple will go through many changes of clothing and backgrounds in a similar manner to the fashion based approach.

Wedding photography with a photojournalistic approach. There is an emphasis on conveying an emotion within one's wedding day.

The term contemporary wedding photography is used to describe wedding photography that is not of a traditional nature. The emphasis in contemporary photography is to capture the story and atmosphere from the day, so the viewer has an appreciation of what the wedding was like, rather than a series of pre-determined poses. This term can be mistaken for meaning any photograph that is not posed or formal. The advent and advancement of digital cameras (and increased use of the internet) means that many people can offer their services as a wedding photographer, but contemporary wedding photography is more than taking informal photographs and involves the use of composition, lighting, and timing to capture photographs that have a strong visual appeal.

There is some uncertainty over what constitutes contemporary and how this differs from other forms of wedding photography. The PSA Journal, March 1994, records a debate on this subject.[2] This highlights the difficulty with the word "contemporary" when defining photographic expression, as some feel this term is not sufficiently defined. For example, is photojournalism contemporary or is it different? Photojournalism is easier to define, as the term infers the photography is by its nature similar to journalism, where the emphasis is upon reporting and recording events in a newsworthy manner, whereas contemporary may include an element of photojournalism but is not exclusively that style of photography.

However, the landscape of Wedding Photography has constantly evolved, it is a creative discipline and those proponents at the leading edge of the industry are constantly feeding new ideas into the photographic community. As a result trends will develop, mostly based around the core elements discussed. Some will be transitory while others will remain a traditional part. Time, locations, events, sets and wedding costumes are always considerations to come up with creative ideas for wedding photography.

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